CI-63 Investigation of Potential Detention Basins near FM 528 and Dixie Farm Road

CI-63 Investigation of Potential Detention Basins near FM 528 and Dixie Farm Road

Last Modified: 05/20/2020 12:57 PM

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As of 04/14/2020

Recent Actions

May 19, 2020 – Harris County Commissioners Court approved updates to project details in the 2018 Bond Program List. Update consolidates project with Bond ID CI-62 into a single project.

May 19, 2020 – Harris County Commissioners Court approved updates to project details in the 2018 Bond Program List. Update changes project title and funding to reflect consolidation with Bond ID CI-63

December 20, 2019 – Study complete.

November 12, 2019 - Harris County Commissioners Court authorized negotiations with various political jurisdictions for agreements in support of collaborative efforts to implement the Clear Creek Federal Flood Risk Management Project and Clear Creek watershed bond project.

November 13, 2018 – Harris County Commissioners Court approved a $260,000 agreement with an engineering firm to conduct an engineering investigation in support of this project.

August 28, 2018 – Harris County Commissioners Court authorized negotiations with an engineering firm to conduct an engineering investigation in support of this project.

August 28, 2018 – Harris County Commissioners Court authorized and initiated this project.

Project description

Out-of-bank flooding along Clear Creek caused approximately 3,000 homes to flood within the Friendswood city limits during Hurricane Harvey. During the community engagement meetings prior to the 2018 bond election, City of Friendswood community members requested that the Flood Control District evaluate potential detention along Clear Creek near the City of Friendswood.

As a result, the Flood Control District contracted with an engineering firm in 2019 to evaluate potential locations for stormwater detention basins between Dixie Farm Road and Farm-to-Market 528. The study is now complete.

Nine potential regional stormwater detention basin alternatives were evaluated in the area. Due to the characteristics of the watershed, the study found that none of the alternatives, without a broader plan for stormwater management measures beyond just regional detention, were significantly beneficial, cost-effective or sustainable. The alternative with the highest cost-benefit ratio removes just 30 structures and 41 acres from the 1% (100 year) storm event. This would come at a cost of $500,000 per structure and would only provide flood reduction to those structures in the immediate vicinity of the alternative. None of the alternatives remove a significant length of roadway from the floodplain.

The potential stormwater detention basins included in this study were primarily located in low-lying areas adjacent to Clear Creek in areas that experience deep flooding during a 100-year storm event. Results of the analysis indicate that the basins in these areas will fill with stormwater early in a storm event, rendering them inefficient at reducing water surface elevations when peak flows are flowing down the channel. The study found that it could be more beneficial to construct regional stormwater detention basins in the mid to upper reaches of Clear Creek’s large tributaries rather than along the main channel where backwater effects from the channel are more prevalent. Stormwater detention basins in the mid to upper areas may significantly reduce peak flow and peak water surface elevations along the main channel. As part of the Clear Creek Federal Flood Risk Management Project, the Flood Control District is exploring basin options on undeveloped land along the Turkey Creek tributary. Once that evaluation is complete, the study will be updated with the findings.

engineering report

Final Study Report

The Harris County Flood Control District has a significant number of flood damage reduction projects occurring all over Harris County as part of its on-going Capital Improvement Program (CIP), Operations and Maintenance, and the 2018 Bond Program. Click on the red and orange highlighted areas to learn about projects' details. Some early-stage projects are not highlighted in the map. The map will be updated when projects advance or when more information becomes available. 

• Maintenance Projects   
• Capital Projects

PROJECT LIFECYCLE

Every flood damage reduction project is unique. Yet each project begins and ends, with common and predictable milestones along the way. Whether a project moves forward – and how quickly – depends on many factors, including the availability of funding at each milestone, shifting community priorities for flood damage reduction, and other changing circumstances (such as the price of trees or concrete) from year to year.

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