Flooding & Floodplains

Flooding & Floodplains

"Even if you don't live near a creek and even if you know for certain you are not in a floodplain, you can still flood. Harris County is very flat. It takes a long time for storm water runoff to travel overland or through storm sewers to a Flood Control District channel. If a foot of rain fell in one day in your neighborhood, the water waiting to get into the storm sewer inlet in your yard or street may back-up into your house. No one in Harris County is safe from flooding." - Martha F. Juch, P.E., CFM, M.ASCE

> Flooding Preparedness (English) PDF
> Flooding Preparedness (Spanish) PDF

> Hurricane Evacuation Routes Map
> Hurricane Evacuation Zip Zones

Flooding Facts

  • Floods have caused a greater loss of life and property, and have disrupted more families and communities in the United States than all other natural hazards combined.
  • Flooding is the #1 Natural Catastrophe Worldwide
  •  The peril of flood can happen at almost anytime, almost anywhere, it does not take a catastrophic event to create flooding which results in catastrophic loss.
  • The catastrophe of Tropical Storm Allison is unprecedented for any major metropolitan U.S. city. But, it doesn't take a catastrophe for flooding to occur. It can happen almost anytime, almost anywhere. A storm of this magnitude in our region will happen again. It's only a matter of when.
  •  There are long-term effects of hurricanes on pollen levels. Pollen conditions may normalize or drop below pre-hurricane levels because the vegetation is stunted. This effect can persist for some time depending on the extent of damage. Tree pollen counts, for example, may be lower the next spring if a significant number of trees are lost to the hurricane.

Did you know?

  • Everyone lives in a flood zone.
  • You don't need to live near water to be flooded.
  • Floods are caused by storms, melting snow, hurricanes, and water backup due to inadequate or overloaded drainage systems, dam or levee failure, etc.