September 23-24

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September 02, 2017 7:46:01 PM CST

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CONTINUES CONTROLLED RELEASES FROM ADDICKS AND BARKER RESERVOIRS WITH NO CHANGES OR IMPACTS TO ADDITIONAL STRUCTURES ALONG BUFFALO BAYOU

Controlled releases of stormwater from Addicks and Barker reservoirs into Buffalo Bayou, at a combined total of 13,300 cubic feet per second, continue as planned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. These discharge rates have continued steady since Friday afternoon and will NOT impact additional structures downstream along Buffalo Bayou.

At approximately 5:45 p.m. today, the City of Houston issued a mandatory evacuation for residents living in the impacted areas downstream along Buffalo Bayou. Anyone with questions about the City’s mandatory evacuation order should call their call center at 3-1-1.

During the last press conference held on Friday, September 1, the Corps message remained the same: Higher-than-normal controlled releases will likely continue through the second week of September from the reservoirs into Buffalo Bayou as the Corps works to lower water levels in both reservoirs. Those homes already affected by the release rates would continue to experience the current water level for an extended amount of time, but NO additional structures would be impacted. The reservoir gates are at no risk of failure and the earthen dams, which are continually monitored by the Corps, are fine.

Current pool levels in the Addicks and Barker reservoirs are below their peak and continue falling. Corps officials are keeping a close eye on the forecast and will make the decision whether or not to close the reservoir gates again, in advance of any future storms moving into the region.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns and operates the reservoirs, which were built in the 1940s to protect against flooding in downtown Houston and the Houston Ship Channel. Outlet gates were later added as a further safety measure so that stormwater releases could be controlled to minimize downstream flooding risks.

Any questions regarding the reservoirs should be directed to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Galveston District Emergency Operations Center at 409-766-6377 or www.swg.usace.army.mil. On Facebook, www.facebook.com/GalvestonDistrict or Twitter, www.twitter.com/USACEgalveston

About the Harris County Flood Control District

The Harris County Flood Control District provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure.