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Harris County Flood Control District's Communications Department staff is available to help members of the media find answers to questions about the Harris County Flood Control District, including our plans, projects, and programs. 

It is very important that we know the subject of your interview, questions you would like answered, your deadline and where you can be contacted. 

PLEASE NOTE: 

In the event of a flooding emergency, tropical storm or hurricane, the Harris County Flood Control District will coordinate with the Harris County Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Management (HCOHSEM) to communicate information about flooding and public safety. If HCOHSEM activates its Emergency Operations Center (EOC), we will answer media calls, schedule media interviews and participate in media briefings from the EOC's location at: 

TranStar  
6922 Old Katy Road 
Houston, TX 77024 

Please fill out the form below with all required information and it will go directly to a member of the Communications Department staff.

Press Releases

Nov. 20, 2019
Construction to begin on Stormwater Detention Basin Project Along Brays Bayou

CONSTRUCTION TO BEGIN ON STORMWATER DETENTION BASIN PROJECT ALONG BRAYS BAYOU

 

The Harris County Flood Control District is set to begin construction on a series of stormwater detention basins located at Braeswood Boulevard between Endicott Lane and South Post Oak Road to reduce the risk of flooding in the vicinity of the basins and along Brays Bayou.  

 

Harris County Commissioners Court issued a notice to proceed on the project, allowing the project to begin in the coming days. The project is expected to take four months to complete. 

 

"We are working with a sense of urgency to break ground and complete hundreds of individual flood control projects like these across Harris County," said Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo. "Flooding is the most common and costly type of disaster we face, and we'll continue to pursue a flood agenda that is fast, fair and smart to protect neighborhoods and communities that for too long have been caught in a cycle of flooding and recovery." 

 

The project is a partnership effort with the City of Houston, which will convey the property for the project, and the Flood Control District, which will construct and maintain the basins. 

 

"This project is the type of partnership that leverages the strengths of all our local government entities to bring meaningful protection to many Houston residents," said Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner.  "We look forward to many more opportunities around the City."

 

Consisting of three separate storage cells, the project will collectively hold approximately 37 acre-feet (more than 12 million gallons) of stormwater during heavy rain events.

 

"The Meyerland detention project brings much-needed relief to the Meyerland area, a community that has long suffered from chronic flooding.  With an additional 37 acre feet of detention space, those living near Brays Bayou will have additional security and detention during severe rain events, said Congresswoman Lizzie Fletcher (TX-07)."

 

Additionally, after the project is constructed, tree plantings will take place to replace the trees affected during construction.

 

"I appreciate the Harris County Flood Control District and City of Houston's work to reduce the impact of future storms on the Meyerland area. Meyerland has experienced consecutive, repeated flooding in 2015, 2016, and 2017," said Texas Rep. Sarah Davis, House District 134. "Vital infrastructure projects like this floodwater retention basin will improve quality of life in Meyerland and help give residents peace of mind during the next storm. I look forward to the completion of this project."

 

The contractor will use heavy construction equipment such as dump trucks, excavators and bulldozers to remove trees, vegetation and excavated soil. Motorists are urged to be alert to truck traffic when passing near construction access points.

 

To date, the Flood Control District has made more than $400 million in improvements in the Brays Bayou watershed - primarily through Project Brays, a cooperative effort between the Flood Control District and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For project information and updates, visit www.hcfcd.org/Z02

 

ABOUT THE HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

The Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure. To learn more about the Flood Control District, visit www.hcfcd.org. 

Oct. 28, 2019
HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT COMPLETES PHASE-ONE STUDY OF LARGE DIAMETER TUNNELS FOR STORMWATER CONVEYANCE

HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT COMPLETES PHASE-ONE STUDY OF LARGE DIAMETER TUNNELS FOR STORMWATER CONVEYANCE

The Harris County Flood Control District worked with a team of underground construction experts to take an initial look at the feasibility of constructing large-diameter, deep tunnels to convey stormwater. Underground tunnels could supplement existing bayou and creek capacity to mitigate flooding in Harris County. The team was led by Freese and Nichols with support from Parsons, Brierley Associates, Terracon, HVJ, Sowells Consulting Engineers, and Middleton Brown. 

The study was the first phase of a multi-phased approach and focused on determining the applicability of tunneling by evaluating the hydraulic capacity of tunnels, developing schedules and cost projections, and by comparing geotechnical conditions in Harris County with other active and completed tunnel projects around the United States and the world.

Washington, D.C., currently has two large underground tunnels that were built in part for flood mitigation purposes.

“Our analysis of the geotechnical conditions indicate that the soil and groundwater conditions in Harris County are similar to Washington, D.C. - and could potentially be even better for tunneling,” said Brian Gettinger, P.E., Tunneling Services Leader at Freese and Nichols. “This is a key factor in the phase-one study as it validates that large-diameter, deep tunnels are constructable in Harris County.”

The deep tunnel concept has similarities to a 1996 Flood Control District feasibility study that considered a trenched box culvert system along the Interstate 10 right-of-way. Unlike the 1996 study, the large-diameter tunnel concept has the potential to convey much larger flow rates and to convey the flow all the way into the Houston Ship Channel. The benefits include avoiding impacts to surface structures and property and potentially offering flood damage reduction benefits to a larger region.

“Geotechnical conditions do not appear to present any remarkable nor non-negotiable concerns for the large diameter tunnels at this time,” said Scott Elmer, P.E., Engineering Division Manager at Harris County Flood Control District. “Geologic faults in Harris County may require special design and construction considerations if crossed by a tunnel, but it is not a fatal flaw.”

Preliminary estimates prepared during the phase-one study show that a 10-mile-long, 25- and 40-foot diameter tunnel would cost approximately $1 billion and $1.5 billion, respectively, to construct.

Harris County Flood Control District funded the phase-one study through a $320,000 grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration and an $80,000 cost-share from the Flood Control District’s 2018 Bond Program. Considerations for the next phase of the study are currently in development.

ABOUT THE HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

The Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure. To learn more about the Flood Control District, visit www.hcfcd.org. 

Oct. 10, 2019
HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT AND NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE SIGN $28M AGREEMENT FOR PILOT PROGRAM IN ARMAND, GREENS AND WHITE OAK BAYOU WATERSHEDS

HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT AND NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE SIGN $28M AGREEMENT FOR PILOT PROGRAM IN ARMAND, GREENS AND WHITE OAK BAYOU WATERSHEDS

The Harris County Flood Control District and one of its federal partners, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), signed a partnership agreement for flood damage reduction improvement projects in the Armand Bayou, Greens Bayou, and White Oak Bayou watersheds. The agreement will fund a $28 million pilot project to restore the natural floodplain and to reduce flooding risks in the project areas.

“Through our conservation programs, NRCS can help communities address serious and long-lasting damages as a result of natural disasters,” said Kristy Oates, NRCS acting state conservationist for Texas. “This pilot project allows NRCS and the Harris County Flood Control District to cooperatively restore floodplains while mitigating flood risks.”

The agreement was approved by Harris County Commissioners Court on October 8, 2019 and jointly signed thereafter.

“This partnership is yet another important step we are taking to build a more resilient Harris County,” said Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo. “As we witnessed yet again with Tropical Storm Imelda, we are ground zero for catastrophic flooding in Texas. The good news is we are not powerless against this challenge. By moving forward with projects like this we will deliver long-term benefits to our residents and build upon Harris County’s work to lead the nation in innovative solutions to flood control and mitigation.”

The NRCS Program helps eligible entities implement emergency recovery measures to relieve imminent hazards to life or property caused by a natural disaster. NRCS provides technical and financial assistance for measures that reduce threats to life or property from a watershed impairment, including sediment and debris removal and also provide protection from additional flooding or soil erosion. In addition to implementing emergency measures, assistance is available to purchase floodplain easements.

To date, the NRCS has provided more than $80 million in funding for drainage infrastructure repair and improvement projects across Harris County.

ABOUT THE HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

The Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure. To learn more about the Flood Control District, visit www.hcfcd.org. 

Oct. 3, 2019
HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT HAS COMPLETED FIRST ROUND OF HARVEY DAMAGE DRAINAGE REPAIRS; NEXT ROUND UNDERWAY

HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT HAS COMPLETED FIRST ROUND OF HARVEY DAMAGE DRAINAGE REPAIRS; NEXT ROUND UNDERWAY

Harris County Flood Control District has recently completed drainage infrastructure repairs using the first $13 million from a post-Hurricane Harvey grant awarded by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The NRCS was able to assist the Harris County community using funding from the Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program.


“U”106

Example of Harvey Repairs: General channel erosion repairs and sheet pile replacement on Horsepen Creek, HCFCD Unit U106-00-00

“The EWP Program helps eligible entities implement emergency recovery measures to relieve imminent hazards to life or property caused by a natural disaster,” said Mark Northcut, Natural Resource Manager, USDA-NRCS Texas. “NRCS provides technical and financial assistance for measures that reduce threats to life or property from a watershed impairment, including sediment and debris removal and also provides protection from additional flooding or soil erosion. In addition to implementing emergency measures, assistance available under the EWP Program includes the purchase of floodplain easements.”

Repairs from the first NRCS grant, consisting of hundreds of individual repair efforts, are located in the Greens Bayou, Cypress Creek, Little Cypress Creek and Addicks Reservoir watersheds.

More than $80 million in additional drainage infrastructure repair projects across Harris County are still in the bidding or construction stages, with an estimated completion date of Fall 2020. This work included sinkholes, bank erosion, failed concrete, collapsed outfall pipes and other damage that totaled more than 1,200 damage sites caused by Hurricane Harvey.

ABOUT THE HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

The Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure. To learn more about the Flood Control District, visit www.hcfcd.org. 

Sept. 19, 2019
LAKE CONROE, BAYOU, AND CREEK UPDATE

HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT HAS COMPLETED FIRST ROUND OF HARVEY DAMAGE DRAINAGE REPAIRS; NEXT ROUND UNDERWAY

Intense rainfall rates of 10-15 inches on average fell across the Kingwood, Humble, Huffman, Crosby, Atascocita, Highlands, and Mont Belvieu areas. This has caused flash flooding in urban areas, overbank flooding, and near bankfull conditions across Northeast Harris County, Liberty County, and Southeast Montgomery County.

Lake Conroe is currently at 199.04 feet above mean sea level (msl), which is two feet below normal pool elevation of 201-feet. The Lake Conroe watershed has averaged about an inch and a half of rainfall in the past 24 hours, with isolated rainfall just over four inches. Lake Conroe dam gates remain closed and no water is being released.

Road closures per Montgomery County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management:

. 2854 / W Loop
. FM 2090 & FM 3083
. Rocky Road / Crystal Creek
. S Frazier (75) & S Loop 336
. Grogans Mill & Wellman Rd
. Aldine Westfield & Legend Estates
. Birnham Woods & Imperial Promenade
. 1st / Hill and Dale
. 59 & FM 1314
. 59 & 2090
. 29600 Robinson
. FishCreek Thoroughfare / 2854
. 45 & 242
. Lake Front & Six Pines
. Lake Robbins Dr
. 45 & 336
. Imperial Oaks & Rayford
. Aldine Westfield & Northridge Forest
. 21000 Riley Fuzzel
. Willis Waukegan & Marshall
. Rose Rd & 1484
. 3083 & S Loop 336
. Crater Hill & 3083
. Willis Waukegan
. 1314 & Creighton
. 830 & Post Oak
. Douget & Sadie
. Whiporwhill & Crystal Creek
. River Oaks Dr and Needham
. North Woodloch
. 10700 - 10800 River Oaks Dr
. Ruby St & FM 2090
. Oak Lawn & Enloe
. First St & Memorial
. Cole Dr & Pinemont
. E Christine & US Hwy 59
. Dallie Sue & FM 2090
. Cox St & Old US Hwy 59
. US 59 & Rebel
. Punkin & Penny
. Tommy Smith Rd & Fire Tower
. FM 1485 & Fire Tower
. 26100 block Hill and Dale Ave
. Porter Lane Rd & Porter Ln
. 18300 Old Houston Rd
. FM 1485 & Vick
. 1st St & FM 2090
. Vick & White Oak Dr
. S Navasota
. N Navasota
. Trinity Way
. Huff Rd & Daw Collins
. Idle Glen Rdwy
. FM 2090 near Morgan Drive
. Valley Ranch & Valley Ranch
. Morgan Cemetery & Fostoria
. FM 2090 & Tram Rd
. Hwy 59 & Creekwood
. 27880 E River Dr
. FM 1485 & San Jacinto River
. Old Hwy 105E & S Duck Creek Rd
. E River & 59
. Duke Rd & 2090
. S Tram Rd & Hill and Dale
. Tallow Vista & Fostoria
. 59 & Kingsport
. 105 & Fosteria
. 59 & 242
. Fosteria & Tallow Vista
. US 59 & FM1485
. US 59 & Roman Forest
. Gene Campbell/1485
. FIRE TOWER / FM 1485
. First St & Ruddick
. US 59 / FOSTERIA RD

Several bayous are near the top of banks, while San Jacinto, Cypress Creek, White Oak, Greens, Halls, Hunting and Cedar Bayous have overtopped their banks. An update on bayous and creeks that Flood Control District officials are watching closely:
The following are out of banks:

. Lake Houston at FM 1960
. Caney Creek at FM 2090
. Peach Creek at FM 2090
. East Fork San Jacinto at FM 1485
. East Fork San Jacinto at FM 2090
. Garners Bayou at Beltway 8
. Greens Bayou at US 59
. Halls Bayou at Airline Drive
. P138 at Aldine Westfield Road
. Cedar Bayou at US 90
. Gum Gully at Diamond Head Boulevard
. Buttermilk Creek at Moorberry Lane
. Little White Oak Bayou at Tidwell Road
. Brickhouse Gully at Costa Rica Road
. Cedar Bayou at FM1942
. Cypress Creek at Cypresswood Drive
. San Jacinto River at US 59
. San Jacinto River at US 90
. White Oak Bayou at Heights Boulevard
. Brickhouse Gully at Hollister
. South Mayde Creek at Greenhouse Road
. Hunting Bayou at Lockwood Drive
. Hunting Bayou at I-10

The following are nearing bankfull:
. Clear Creek at Bay Area Boulevard
. San Jacinto River at Lake Houston Pkwy
. Greens Bayou at Beltway 8
. Garners Bayou at Rankin Road
. Cedar Bayou at SH 146
. Halls Bayou at Jensen Drive
. Briar Branch at Campbell Road
. Rummel Creek at Brittmoore Road
. Goose Creek at Baker Road
. Little White Oak Bayou at Trimble Street
. San Jacinto at SH 242
. Armand Bayou at Genoa-Red Bluff Road
. Carpenters Bayou at I-10
. Carpenters Bayou at US 90
. Hunting Bayou at Loop 610
. Halls Bayou at Tidwell Road
. Buffalo Bayou at Milam Street
. Willow Water Hole at Landsdowne
. Keegans Bayou at Rocky Road
. Keegans Bayou at Keegan Road
. Buffalo Bayou at Peek Road

Widespread street flooding continues across Harris, Liberty, and Montgomery Counties Residents in these areas should not travel and stay off the roadways. All other bayous and creeks are responding and remain within banks.

For a list of flooded street locations, visit the Houston Transtar website at:

http://traffic.houstontranstar.org/roadclosures/#highwater

Rainfall and bayou water levels can be monitored on the Harris County Regional Flood Warning System website (desktop and mobile versions) at: harriscountyfws.org. Continue to follow us on Facebook @SanJacintoRiverAuthority and Twitter @SJRA_1937 and @HCFCD for updates.