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August 27, 2017 2:29:53 AM CST

BAYOUS AND CREEKS UPDATE AS OF 1:30 AM

The Harris County Flood Control District's Flood Operations team continues to monitor this extremely dangerous and life-threatening flash flood event still in progress over much of southeast Harris County. Rainfall across Harris County has continued to intensify, with rainfall totals in the last three to six hours that have greatly exceeded our 500-year rainfall levels.

Rainfall totals include:

  • Three-hour totals: 10-13 inches from Friendswood to City of South Houston
  • Six-hour totals: 12-14 inches from Friendswood to the City of South Houston
  • 24-hour totals: widespread 8-12 inches over much of Harris County, with isolated totals of 13-14 inches over south Houston and north Waller County

 Widespread street flooding continues across Harris County. Transtar is currently reporting 143 high water locations. Please check the Houston Transtar website at http://traffic.houstontranstar.org/roadclosures/#highwater for a list of locations. 

 REMINDER: Do not drive or walk into high-water areas. For the next few hours, residents should remain in place and DO NOT ATTEMPT to drive. If faced with flooding, STAY PUT wherever you are, unless your life is threatened, and then CALL 911.

As of 1:30 a.m., the following is a list of area bayous currently being affected:

  • Beamer Ditch
  • Turkey Creek
  • Berry Bayou
  • Little Vince Bayou
  • Vince Bayou
  • Armand Bayou
  • Hunting Bayou
  • Langham Creek
  • Clear Creek
  • Halls Bayou
  • Greens Bayou
  • Brays Bayou
  • Keegans Bayou
  • Little Cypress Creek
  • Horsepen Creek
  • South Mayde Creek
  • West Fork San Jacinto River

A National Weather Service Flash Flood Warning remains in effect for Harris County until further notice.

The flood threat remains as Harvey continues to dump rain over Harris County. It is important for residents to stay tuned and pay close attention to additional rain throughout the remainder of the weekend.

The Flood Control District's Flood Operations team continues in full operation. The Flood Control District’s phone bank will remain open through the remainder of this event. Residents are urged to call with questions regarding flooding or to report any structural flooding at 713-684-4000.

Stay tuned and pay close attention to messages from emergency officials as this storm is quickly changing. Heed all advice given by local emergency officials. Evacuate only if you have been told to do so.

When flooding is imminent the following are steps YOU CAN TAKE DURING THE STORM:

  • Restrict children from playing in flooded areas.
  • Remain in your home during the storm unless instructed to evacuate by local officials.
  • Move emergency supplies and valuables to a high, dry place in your residence.
  • Locate and put pets in a safe place.
  • Never drive into high water. Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Less than two feet of water can float and wash away a vehicle. Be especially cautious at underpasses and at night when water across roadways can be difficult to see.
  • The Harris County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management has disaster preparedness resources and the latest information about conditions in Harris County at readyharris.org. The Flood Control District has a “Family Flood Preparedness” center at www.hcfcd.org/famfloodprepare.html with helpful, printable resources and flood preparedness tips.
  • This flooding event is a reminder that all residents in this area should carry flood insurance. Contact your insurance agent for more information about purchasing flood insurance, or visit the National Flood Insurance Program at fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program or call 1-888-379-9531. Please keep in mind that new insurance policies take 30 days to go into effect.

About the Harris County Flood Control District

The Harris County Flood Control District provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure.